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  • Thursday, Aug 18, 2022

    Events
    Events Guest Speakers  Sessions & Past Recordings Click the links below to attend our speaker sessions and view past recordings. July 13 - Sebastian Burton July 20 - Aziza Brown July 27 - Jennifer Dill August 3 - Dan Komorny  August 10 - Marjorie Martin  Tournaments Coming Soon! Images: Image by Alex Haney under Unsplash License
    By: Michigan Virtual
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    Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    Introduction to Esports: Calling All Gamers!
    Introduction to Esports: Calling All Gamers! Does your middle or high schooler play video games?Are they interested in discovering what the world of esports is all about? For just $39.99, you get access to exciting lesson content, guest speakers, and the chance to participate in gaming tournaments. This flexible course is available through September 9, 2022.  sign up using the orange button in the top-right corner of this page What’s Esports? Does your child play Fortnite, League of Legends, Overwatch, or Rocket League? These are just a few of the most popular games in the rising world of esports. Esports has been recognized by the National Federation of State High School Associations as an official sport, with thousands of teams being established every year. Simply put, esports are video games played in an organized and competitive environment. There are growing esports teams in schools, which have resulted in millions of dollars in college scholarships. This growing field can provide your child with a sense of community, feelings of accomplishment, and skills that can strengthen their futures. Introduction to Esports Course Esports requires knowledge and skill-building that is obtained both during gameplay and away from the controller. This Introduction to Esports course provides your child with the foundational skills to thrive in this exciting sport and shares how they can use this knowledge in other areas of their life. Each module dives into specific topics, such as: A look into the art and design that goes into a video game Why caring for your mental and physical health matters  What goes behind advertising and content creation Career pathways and transferable 21st-century skill-building What You Get When You Sign Up Lessons and modules that can be completed at your own pace Live sessions with esports experts Opportunity to participate and show off their gaming abilities in gaming tournaments! (Please note: Michigan Virtual will not provide access to games or systems for tournaments.) sign up using the orange button in the top-right corner of this page Exclusive Live Sessions with Esports Experts When you enroll in this course, you will have the opportunity to attend six live sessions with esports experts. These sessions will be recorded and available to view during the course duration. If You're Interested, sign up using the orange button in the top-right corner of this page!
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    1.1-Introduction to Esports: Overview of Course
    Introduction to Esports: Overview of Course In this course, you will be introduced to the esports industry. Esports is a part of the booming video gaming industry! Course Objectives Recognize opportunities that come from playing and participating in esports Develop 21st-century transferable skills and competencies that benefit career and college pathways Acquire knowledge of personal mental/physical health skills to be used in all aspects of life Course Outline There are six modules for this course. Each module has lessons within them. Modules, and their lessons, will become available as we progress through the term. 1 - Introduction to Esports 2 - Organizers 3 - Content Creators 4 - Entrepreneurs 5 - Strategists 6 - Conclusion Completing Course If you click ‘Browse’ on the left-hand side of your screen, you can view all available modules and lessons. Modules will be marked as ‘Complete’ after completing the modules' lessons. Modules will be marked as ‘Continue’ if you have not yet completed all of the lessons within that module. Make sure you take a moment to answer and submit the survey in the last lesson of each module too!  Tournaments and Guest Speaker Events If you click ‘Events’ on the left-hand side of your screen, you can view information on tournaments and guest speaker events. This is where the details for each tournament and recordings for guest speaker events will be. Need Help? If you need help with anything in the course, please click on ‘Help’ on the left-hand side of your screen, and read the FAQs. Are you ready to begin the course? Click here to view the next lesson: 1.2-Introduction to Esports: Welcome. Images: "Overwatch" by Florian Olivo under Unsplash License "ASES en las finales EPS Callao" by artubr under CC BY 2.0, via Flickr Course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    1.2-Introduction to Esports: Welcome
    Introduction to Esports: Welcome Welcome to the Introduction to Esports course! We will begin this course with a video from Marcus Howard, co-founder, and CEO of MetArena. When watching the video, think about how significant and far-reaching the video game industry is. Go ahead and watch it now!  Introduction to Esports Direct Video Link: Introduction to Esports View/download the video transcript In the video, Marcus mentioned that the video game industry is a global 180 billion-dollar industry! About half a percent of this global market, or 1.25 billion dollars, is for esports. This esports sector is growing rapidly. In this course, we will discuss the four esports domains that Marcus mentioned - Organizers, Content Creators, Entrepreneurs, and Strategists.  Apply What You've Learned Marcus mentioned that the global 180 billion-dollar video game industry is enormous. How much did he say it was bigger than? Fill in the spot below to complete the statement. Drag and drop the appropriate tile to complete the statement. Lesson Review The video game industry continues to expand and grow, and so does esports. Now that you learned some of the history and where the gaming industry and esports have come from, you will be introduced to the four domains of esports. In the next lesson, you will complete some surveys to see which domain of esports matches your interests and skills. Click here to view the next lesson: 1.3-Introduction to Esports: Four Esports Domains. Images: "esports" by Sam Churchill under CC BY 2.0, via Flickr "Esports" by a.canvas.of.light under CC BY 2.0, via Flickr Video images: "Earth emoji" by OpenClipart under CC0 1.0, via Free SVG "Font Awesome 5 regular thumps-up" by Font Awesome under CC BY 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Stanford University campus from above" by Jawed Karim. under CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Desktop computer cartoon art" by OpenClipart under CC0 1.0, via Free SVG "Rolling Stone Lorde Cover" by Kiwicanary under CC BY-ND 2.0, via Flickr "Space War - Tekniska museet - Stockholm, Sweden" by Daderot under CC0 1.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Spacewar screenshot" by Kenneth Lu under CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Atari 2600 logo" by Locke Cole under CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Atari-400-Comp" by Evan-Amos under CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Chuck E. Cheese's" by Mike Mozart under CC BY 2.0, via Flickr "The Evolution of iMac" by Aaron Parecki under CC BY 2.0, via Flickr "Wii U Console and Gamepad" by Takimata under CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons Image by TDrzewo under Pixabay License Image by manpinderdctc under Pixabay License "Intellivision-Console-Set" by Evan-Amos under CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Atari Pong arcade game front" by spablab under CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Space Invaders Wallpaper" by Reinis Ivanovs under CC BY-SA 2.0, via Flickr "Rebecca Heineman on Burgertime" by Rebecca Heineman under CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Logo Nintendo" by Nintendo Inc. under CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Wikipedia NES PAL" by JCD1981NL under CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons Image by Simon under Pixabay License "E3 2011 - outside the LA convention center" by Doug Kline under CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons "XBox-Live-Support" by http://www.xbox.com/en-US/promotions/sales/sales-and-specials under CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons "PS5 Sony PSN" by steamXO under CC PDM 1.0, via Flickr "Twitch Logo" by Diegosegura.me under CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Nintendo Gameboy" by William Warby under CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons Image by Unknown under CC0 1.0, via PxHere Image by kaboompics under Pixabay License "Nokia 3310 phone" by Santeri Viinamäki under CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Tetris" by Conor Lawless under CC BY 2.0, via Flickr "MEMPTR Snake" by Rept0n1x under CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "PlayStation Vita illustration" by Tokyoship under CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Nintendo DS-Lite-Black-Open" by Evan-Amos under CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "Nokia N-Gage QD" by Archimëa under CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons "iPhone 5" by Zach Vega under CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons "App Store iOS 11 Custom size" by Apple Inc. under CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons Adapted content and course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0  
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    1.3-Introduction to Esports: Four Esports Domains
    Introduction: Four Esports Domains Esports is comprised of more than just players, coaches, and Shoutcasters. There are currently 15 kinds of careers that support competitive video game playing. They fall into four domains - Organizers, Content Creators, Entrepreneurs, and Strategists. We will be learning about all four domains in this course. Are you curious to find out which domain you might excel in? You may have an idea already, or maybe you're new to esports and don't quite know where you might fit in. Either way, you will answer the statements in each survey below to give you an idea of where you can shine, use your skills, and do what you like. Regardless of your video game playing skills, everyone has a "superpower" and will align with one of the four domains. All four domains are equally crucial in esports. Let's get started by answering the statements in the surveys below! Domain Sorting Survey In each survey below, you will see five statements and tiles labeled: 1 - Strongly Disagree 2 - Disagree 3 - Neutral 4 - Agree 5 - Strongly Agree Choose the tile that best represents you for each statement. Drag and drop the appropriate tile next to each statement. You can use each tile multiple times. Once you have selected a tile for each statement, total the numbers on the tiles. Drag and drop the appropriate numbered tile, tiles labeled 5 through 25, into the 'Total Score' box. Complete all four domain surveys. Organizers Content Creators Entrepreneurs Strategists Apply What You've Learned Now that you have finished taking all four surveys look at the domain with the highest total score. That is your domain! Drag and drop the tile with your domain to answer the question below. If you have a tie, pick the tile of the domain that you feel best represents you from the tied domains. These four domains support competitive video game playing with 15 different types of careers. In the memory game below, you will find domains and careers on cards. Search for images of domains and their matching careers. Can you find all the matches in the least amount of card turns possible? Lesson Review Even though these surveys let you know your domain, it is a good idea to learn about all of them. You may find your interests change in the future! All four of these domains are essential in esports. We will be going into more detail about each in the upcoming modules: Module 2-Organizers Module 3-Content Creators Module 4-Entrepreneurs Module 5-Strategists Module 6-Conclusion Now that we have identified your domain and briefly discussed all four domains, it is time to go into our next module, Organizers! Click here to view the next lesson: 2.1-Organizers: Introduction. Before you Leave the Introduction to Esports Module... Images: Image by byronton under Pixabay License Images, adapted content, and course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0  
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    2.1-Organizers: Introduction
    Organizers: Introduction Welcome to the Organizers domain of esports! To get us started in this domain, we will look at a video from Marcus Howard, co-founder, and CEO of MetArena. Let's check it out!  Organizers Domain Direct Video Link: Organizers View/download the video transcript Marcus mentioned that Organizers play a significant role in the video gaming industry. They can work on a team that gets the final version of a game shelf-ready to tournament organizers who oversee all aspects of gaming events.  Apply What You've Learned In the Organizers video, Marcus mentioned that Organizers have to plan and coordinate various aspects continuously for their jobs, like planning a gaming tournament. What did he say was the purpose of Organizers putting together esports events? Fill in the spot below to complete the statement. Drag and drop the appropriate tile to complete the statement. Lesson Review Now that we have been introduced to the Organizers domain, we can move into the rest of the module. This module includes the following lessons: Lesson 2.2-Organizers: Career Pathways and Real-World Connection Lesson 2.3-Organizers: The Roadmap to Video Game Play and Story Content Lesson 2.4-Organizers: Code of Conduct Lesson 2.5-Organizers: Healthy Eating First up is learning all about different careers and skills in the Organizers domain! Click here to view the next lesson: 2.2-Organizers: Career Pathways and Real-World Connection. Images: "Men Playing Computer Games" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License "DJ Khlaed during EA Sport's 2020 Superbowl Party in Miami" by Josh Berendes under Unsplash License "Men Playing Computer Games" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License Adapted content and course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    2.2-Organizers: Career Pathways and Real-World Connection
    Organizers: Career Pathways and Real-World Connection Do you have an interest in getting a job in the esports industry? Are you curious to know what types of jobs are out there? There are many jobs besides being just a Player! In the esports world, four main domains help support the Players. The first domain we are going to discuss is the Organizers. Careers in esports-related fields for Organizers include event management, focusing on working with event planning companies, tournament events within game design companies, and freelance work. They also help develop new hire training and development tools and documents as part of the Human Resources/Training & Organizational Development teams in global hospitality, international corporate business, and managed esports teams. The Organizers domain has three careers - IT Support, Event Organizers, and General Managers. Let's look at each one of these careers in more detail! IT Support IT Support maintain computer networks and provide technical help to computer users. What do they do? Assist computer users and organizations Maintain computer networks or provide technical help directly to computer users Analyze customers' computer problems to diagnose them and determine the cause Document customers' descriptions of their computer problems Guide customers through the recommended problem-solving steps Set up or repair computer equipment and related devices Install and train users on new hardware or software Inform team members and managers of significant problems or of customers' recurring concerns  What skills do they need? Communication Skills: They must convey information orally and in writing. They must describe solutions to computer problems in a way non-technical users can understand. Customer-Service Skills: They must be patient and sympathetic. They often help people who are frustrated trying to use software or hardware. Listening Skills: They must be able to understand the problems that their customers are describing and know when to ask questions for clarification. Problem-Solving Skills: They must identify simple and complex computer problems and then analyze and solve them. Technology Skills: They must understand how various technologies work and be able to learn and troubleshoot both hardware and software issues. Event Organizers Event Organizers arrange all aspects of events and professional gatherings. They arrange meeting locations, transportation, and other details. What do they do? Meet with clients to understand the purpose of the event Plan the scope of the event, including its time, location, and cost Solicit bids from venues and service providers Inspect venues to ensure that they meet the client's requirements Coordinate event services such as rooms, transportation, and food Monitor event activities to ensure that the client and the attendees are satisfied Review event bills and approve payments What skills do they need? Communication Skills: They exchange information with clients, suppliers, and event staff. They must have excellent written and oral communication skills to express the needs of their clients. Interpersonal Skills: They must establish and maintain positive relationships with clients and suppliers. Negotiation Skills: They must be able to secure quality products and services at reasonable prices for clients. Organizational Skills: They must multitask, pay attention to details, and meet tight deadlines. Problem-Solving Skills: They must be able to anticipate potential issues and prepare creative solutions that satisfy clients. General Managers General Managers plan strategies and policies to ensure that an organization meets its goals. They coordinate and direct the work activities of companies and organizations. What do they do? Establish and carry out departmental or organizational goals, policies, and procedures Direct and oversee an organization's financial and budgetary activities Manage general activities related to making products and providing services Consult with other executives, staff, and board members about general operations Negotiate or approve contracts and agreements Appoint department heads and managers Analyze financial statements, sales reports, and other performance indicators Identify places to cut costs and improve performance, policies, and programs What skills do they need? Communication Skills: They must convey information clearly and persuasively. They must discuss issues, negotiate with others, direct staff, and explain policies and decisions to people within and outside the organization. Decision-Making Skills: They must be able to assess different options and choose the best course of action when setting policies and managing an organization. Leadership Skills: They must be able to shape and direct an organization by coordinating policies, people, and resources. Problem-Solving Skills: They need to identify and resolve organizational issues. They must be able to recognize shortcomings and carry out solutions. Time-Management Skills: They do many tasks concurrently to ensure that their work gets done and that the organization meets its goals. Apply What You've Learned Did you notice that each of these careers has skills that are needed? In the activity below, you will see definitions for some of the skills mentioned in the three careers of the Organizers domain. Drag and drop each tile to its appropriate definition. Can you identify all five? Lesson Review To support the Players in the esports world, the Organizers have three careers: IT Support Event Organizers General Managers All three careers have communication and problem-solving skills listed as needed to perform the job. Next time you watch an esports tournament, take a moment to think about all the skills that Organizers had to use and the tasks they had to complete to make the event a success! Now we'll look at the elements of all video games. Click here to view the next lesson: 2.3-Organizers: The Roadmap to Video Game Play and Story Content. Images: Image by Jose Gil under Unsplash License Image by ELLA DON under Unsplash License Image by Sean Do under Unsplash License "A Woman Smiling while Holding Guitar Controller" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License "A Group in Blue Shirt Doing a High Five" by Ron Lach under Pexels License "The trophy of Dreamhack Open 2019 in Jönköping, Sweden." by Emanuel Ekström under Unsplash License "Man in Yellow Hoodie Looking at the Camera" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License Image by Stem List under Unsplash License "Call of Duty World Championship" by Sean Do under Unsplash License Image by Sean Do under Unsplash License Adapted content: "Occupational Outlook Handbook: Computer Support Specialists" by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics under Bureau of Labor Statistics Public Domain "Occupational Outlook Handbook: Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners" by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics under Bureau of Labor Statistics Public Domain "Occupational Outlook Handbook: Top Executives" by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics under Bureau of Labor Statistics Public Domain Images, adapted content, and course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    2.3-Organizers: The Roadmap to Video Game Play and Story Content
    Organizers: The Roadmap to Video Game Play and Story Content All good video games (even some of the not-so-great ones, too) have a great storyline, and that story is made of certain essential elements. You might have learned about story elements in a reading or English class. Can you think of any elements that you have noticed in video games? In this lesson, let's focus on three things every video game has - The Quest, The Grind, and The Boss Fight! The Quest There is something wrong with the (game) world, and someone has to fix it! Who will that be? Usually, a hero/heroine, or a collection of heroes, understands the problem but not how to fix it. Whether alone or with a group of friends, the hero/heroine sets out on the road to make things right. The quest is the story of that journey. To succeed, the hero/heroine must be able to do different jobs alone or pick friends with other skills who can cover those jobs. The quest cannot be solved by just one kind of hero/heroine or one style of play. The Grind The grind is trying and failing, pure and simple. It is the days, weeks, and months of trying various paths that heroes take to get to their goals, but that can only be accomplished by consistent, persistent activities, even when the reason might be unclear or the way might appear difficult. Did we mention that there is a lot of failing during the grind? If you can get through it, the big prize awaits once you get past... The Boss Fight The boss has what you have been trying long and hard to get, but you have to take it from them, and it's not going to be easy, even with your band of heroes supporting you. The challenges that must be faced on the way to achieving a goal, dealing with losing the "battle," learning from failure, and applying values (personal, cultural, familial, etc.) to eventually win/succeed are all part of this last stand, win-or-go-home fight. On the flip side, let's look at how video games you might like to play have all of these elements and how real-life sometimes (scarily!) mirrors this roadmap! Apply What You've Learned These elements are in every video game. The table below shows an example of Final Fantasy XI with its heroes, quest, grind, and boss fight. Fill out the remaining spots on the table for the other video games. Drag and drop each tile to its appropriate place. Can you get each game's elements correct? Video games can mirror work and life activities as well. In the table below, you will see an example of how an emergency rescue situation can have a real-life job (hero/heroine) that is called to finish a quest. Fill out the remaining spots on the table for the other real-life situations. Drag and drop each tile to its appropriate place. Can you get each real-life situation's elements correct? Lesson Review The Quest, The Grind, and The Boss Fight are three essential elements of every video game. The quest is the journey the hero/heroine must take to complete objectives and accomplish goals. The grind is trying and failing to achieve goals through determination and continuously attempting activities. The boss fight is the last stand, the win-or-go-home fight, to win/succeed after all the challenges faced along the way. Now that you have learned about a video game's story elements let's look at what type of appropriate behavior is expected when you play video games. Click here to view the next lesson: 2.4-Organizers: Code of Conduct. Images: "Man in Black Crew Neck T-shirt Playing Mobile Game" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License "Men Playing Computer Games" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License "Gamers playing on Laptops" by Fredrick Tendong under Unsplash License Image by Tmaximumge under CC0 1.0, via PxHere "Cheerful male teen playing video game on couch" by Andrea Piacquadio under Pexels License Adapted content and course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    2.4-Organizers: Code of Conduct
    Organizers: Code of Conduct Have you ever witnessed a player exhibiting a bad attitude while playing a video game? Or have you seen other types of toxic behavior? Supporting an inclusive culture that welcomes everyone is essential in gaming. Being in a friendly, safe, welcoming, and fun environment for all gamers, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, ethnicity, or religion, is crucial. The following gamer codes outline expectations for appropriate behavior while gaming. Let's Game! Gamer Codes 1.) I agree to be respectful in my words and actions towards others and myself. Gaming should be fun. Avoid actions that put others down or make them feel bad. There is no room for Trolling, Inting, Raging, Tilting, or Negative Spamming. If you are angry about your own play or that of others, take a breath, step away from the game, and chat with someone about something different. When you're ready, join back into a new game with a fresh start. 2.) I agree to be patient and supportive with myself and others. Losses happen. Mistakes and poor play happen. Being salty, harsh critiques, and accusations do not need to happen. Lift others and yourself. Encourage others when they are playing at expectations less than yours or theirs. "Keep trying; you'll get there." "It's okay; it's only a game." 3.) I agree to be welcoming and inclusive of others. Everyone is made to feel welcomed and included. No one discriminates because of background, gender identity, experiences, or other things. 4.) I agree to listen and follow directions by the moderator. The moderator's primary role is to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to enjoy the games and activities while ensuring that everyone feels safe and treated fairly. Sometimes a player may not recognize their inappropriate behavior, and the moderator will provide coaching to help them learn from their mistakes and behavior. The safety of each person comes first. 5.) I agree to do my best to stand up for fair treatment by others and myself. Everyone should be treated fairly. If you see something questionable, tell the moderator. Let's stand up for each other and have fun. 6.) I agree to follow the guidelines for digital citizenship when playing online games. Keep your and anyone else's personal information private. Some gaming options such as Rocket League or League of Legends might include matches with anonymous players. While all games are monitored, you must comply with the following guidelines during these instances: Chat is rarely needed for game-related communications and is not recommended to be used. Microphones may only be used between team players in the gaming room. Do not share any personal information. The focus is on playing the game and getting to know your teammates. If an anonymous gamer shares or asks for personal information, immediately notify the moderator. Play the game with respect, patience, and professional behavior. Your actions reflect on yourself and others in a digital world. Treat others with respectful behavior as you would those you care about. Apply What You've Learned Following the six gamer codes will ensure everyone has a great video gaming experience. In the memory game below, you will find a simplified gamer code on a card. Search for image pairs to reveal the entire gamer code. Try your best to get the least amount of card turns! Lesson Review The gamer codes outlined the expectations for appropriate behavior while gaming. They are essential to ensure that everyone feels welcome and a part of a fun environment. I agree to be respectful in my words and actions towards others and myself. I agree to be patient and supportive with myself and others. I agree to be welcoming and inclusive of others. I agree to listen and follow directions by the moderator. I agree to do my best to stand up for fair treatment by others and myself. I agree to follow the guidelines for digital citizenship when playing online games. Now that we have learned about appropriate behavior while playing video games let's turn our attention to some healthy eating tips. Click here to view the next lesson: 2.5-Organizers: Healthy Eating. Images: "Friends Having Fun Playing Computer Game" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License "Friends Having Fun Playing a Video Game" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License "A Group of People Watching a Man Playing Computer Game" by Ron Lach under Pexels License Image by Artem Podrez under Pexels License "Boy in Front of Computer with Black Headphones" by Ron Lach under Pexels License "Men Playing a Video Game" by Yan Krukov under Pexels License "Man in Black Shirt Wearing Black Headphones while Smiling" by RODNAE Productions under Pexels License "Women Having Fun Playing Video Game" by Yan Krukov under Pexels License Adapted content: "Gamer Code of Conduct" by John McCarthy under CC BY 4.0, via Opening Paths Adapted content and course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    2.5-Organizers: Healthy Eating
    Organizers: Healthy Eating Did you know that 117 million U.S. adults have one or more chronic diseases? And that billions of dollars are spent on medical costs for diet-related chronic diseases? Healthy eating can help reduce the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. Let's check out some information on healthy eating! Healthy Eating Healthy eating is vital at every age. Eat various fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, and dairy or fortified soy alternatives. When deciding what to eat or drink, choose options full of nutrients and limited in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium. Start with the tips below!  Cut Back on Added Sugars Think about your drinks. Balance your meal by drinking water instead of sugary drinks like soda, lemonade, or sports drinks. Try sparkling water with a lemon wedge or a small piece of fresh fruit. Enjoy a sprinkle or two. Skip the sugar and top your coffee with a dash of cinnamon, nutmeg, or cocoa powder instead. This adds a little variety to the flavor of your coffee. Satisfy your sweet tooth. Indulge in a naturally sweet dessert - fruit! Enjoy a fresh fruit salad, baked apples with cinnamon, or a piece of fruit right out of the fridge. Split the sweets. Share dessert with a friend. Half a pastry or slice of cake means only half the added sugars (and calories) for each of you. Pick lower sugar options. Choose packaged foods that have less or no added sugars, such as plain low-fat or fat-free yogurt, unsweetened applesauce, or canned fruit packed in its own juice or water. Check the label. Added sugars are now prominently displayed on the Nutrition Facts label of packaged foods. Use this information to compare added sugars on similar products. Keep in mind that there are many names for added sugars, such as fructose, dextrose, maple syrup, and cane juice. Rethink Fats Check the label first. Read the Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods. Choose products that are lower in saturated fat since these types of fat are less healthy. Eat foods with healthy fats. Eat nuts, seeds, and fatty fish like tuna, salmon, and sardines. These foods and vegetable oils like olive and canola are good sources of unsaturated fat - a healthy fat option. Limit saturated fat. Build meals around protein foods naturally low in saturated fat, such as beans, peas, and lentils, as well as soy foods, skinless chicken, seafood, and lean meats. Skimp on "solid fats." "Solid fats" such as butter, shortening, and fat from meats are high in saturated fats. Switch to olive or canola oil for cooking and trim the fat when possible. Swap the spread. Switch from butter and cream cheese on your toast to nut butter or a spread of avocado and a squeeze of lemon. These spread options contain healthier fats. Customize your order. Order baked or steams options instead of fried foods, especially deep-fried foods. A dash of hot sauce or a spoonful of salsa adds flavor without adding fat. Be Salt Smart Read the label. The Nutrition Facts label shows you how much sodium is in packaged foods. Choose lower sodium foods - especially if you have high blood pressure, diabetes, or kidney disease. Eat fruits and veggies. Enjoy a variety of fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables - almost all of them are naturally low in sodium. Look for canned vegetables labeled "no added salt." Look for cue words. Items that are "pickled," "brined," or "cured" tend to be high in sodium. Include these foods in your meals sparingly. Put together meals at home. Making your own meals gives you more control over the salt you eat. Taste your food before adding salt from the shaker. Go easy on the sauce. Be mindful of how much sauce, gravy, salsa, ketchup, soy sauce, marinade, or dressing you use. The sodium from these can add up quickly. Spice it up. Flavor your foods with fresh or dried herbs and spices instead of salt. Pick spice blends that do not list salt or sodium on the ingredients list. Fruits and Vegetables Take a moment to learn some information about some fruits and vegetables - bell peppers, strawberries, tomatoes, and watermelons. Click the plus signs on each graphic to reveal additional information. Apply What You've Learned Did you learn anything new about bell peppers, strawberries, tomatoes, and watermelons? The table below will show the same fruits and vegetables, facts, and tips on incorporating them into your diet. Fill out the columns of the table for each fruit and vegetable. Drag and drop each tile to its appropriate column. Can you get the correct three in each column? Lesson Review The benefits of healthy eating add up over time, bite by bite. Look at Nutrition Labels to make sure you are limiting added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium. Some things to keep in mind when eating healthy: Start with minor changes. Instead of a diet overhaul, make small changes to what you eat and drink that will work for you now and in the future. Take one day at a time. Sometimes things don't go as planned, even with the best intentions. Don't give up if you miss one day or one milestone for your goal! Be active your way. Pick activities you enjoy! If you focus on having fun or learning a new skill that interests you, you will be likelier to stick with it. Team up. Find a friend with similar goals - swap healthy recipes and be active together. Staying on track is more manageable with support and a cheerleader. Celebrate successes. Think of each change as a "win" as you build positive habits and find ways to reach your goals. Reward yourself - you've earned it! Now we are going to jump into our next module, Content Creators! Click here to view the next lesson: 3.1-Content Creators: Introduction. Before you Leave the Organizers Module... Images: "Bowl of Vegetable Salad and Sliced Fruits" by Trang Doan under Pexels License "Vegetable Sandwich" by Valeria Boltneva under Pexels License "Sliced Green Fruits" by Badulescu Badulescu under Pexels License "Round White Ceramic Saucer And Coffee Cup" by Anna Tukhfatullina Food Photographer/Stylist under Pexels License "Assorted Fruits on Bowl" by Josh Sorenson under Pexels License "Crop woman cutting cake with berries" by Danik Prihodko under Pexels License "Clear Drinking Glass With White Liquid on Brown Wooden Coaster" by Denys Gromov under Pexels License "Honey on White Bowl" by Pixabay under CC0 1.0, via Pexels "Close-Up Photo of Sliced Salmon" by Valeria Boltneva under Pexels License "Seeds in Sacks" by Frans Van Heerden under Pexels License "Bowl of Snap Peas" by R Khalil under Pexels License "Ingredients at Table" by Ron Lach under Pexels License "Avocado Toast on a Gray Plate" by Nicola Barts under Pexels License "Brown and Gray Round Bowl" by cottonbro under Pexels License "Rice in White Ceramic Bowl" by Suzy Hazelwood under Pexels License "Assorted of Fruits on the Table" by Cup of Couple under Pexels License "Clear Glass Jar With Yellow Fruits" by Polina Tankilevitch under Pexels License "Variety of Dishes" by Ella Olsson under Pexels License "Different Types of Sauce" by Jonathan Borba under Pexels License "Assorted Cooking Spices" by Shantanu Pal under Pexels License "Fresh sliced vegetables served with sauce in black bowl on tray" by Polina Tankilevitch under Pexels License Adapted content: "Eat Healthy. Be Healthy. Save. - Dietary Guidelines" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain "Cut Back on Added Sugars" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain "Rethink Fats" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain "Be Salt Smart" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain "Turn Your Resolutions into Real Solutions" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain Images and adapted content: "Food Fact Card: Bell Pepper" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain "Food Fact Card: Strawberry" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain "Food Fact Card: Tomato" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain "Food Fact Card: Watermelon" by U.S. Department of Agriculture under U.S. Department of Agriculture Public Domain Course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    3.1-Content Creators: Introduction
    Content Creators: Introduction  Welcome to the Content Creators domain of esports! To get us started in this domain, we will look at a video from Marcus Howard, co-founder, and CEO of MetArena. Here we go!  Content Creators Domain Direct Video Link: Content Creators View/download the video transcript Marcus mentioned that if you are entertaining, tell funny stories and jokes, and are an exciting person to watch playing games, you can potentially generate ad revenue and sponsorship dollars by becoming a streamer. Content Creators, such as streamers, can also be scouted and recruited to join esports teams. Online tournaments, clan matches, and other local community matches can give you exposure and help you network with other people in the industry. Apply What You've Learned In the Content Creators video, Marcus mentioned that Content Creators could create sound effects for video games. Real-life audio can be recorded for explosions like rocks falling and leaves dropping. What did he say was the real-life audio sound that Content Creators will sometimes use to depict rain? Fill in the spot below to complete the statement. Drag and drop the appropriate tile to complete the statement. Lesson Review Now that we have been introduced to the Content Creators domain, we can move into the rest of the module. This module includes the following lessons: Lesson 3.2-Content Creators: Career Pathways and Real-World Connection Lesson 3.3-Content Creators: Parts of Print Advertisements Lesson 3.4-Content Creators: Color Selection in Logos Lesson 3.5-Content Creators: Healthy Exercises First is learning all about different careers and skills in the Content Creators domain! Click here to view the next lesson: 3.2-Content Creators: Career Pathways and Real-World Connection. Images: "Super Nintendo World in Universal Studios Japan, Osaka" by Roméo A. under Unsplash License "Person Playing Piano With Computer" by Brett Sayles under Pexels License Image by ELLA DON under Unsplash License Adapted content and course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0  
    By: Michigan Virtual
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  • Wednesday, Aug 10, 2022

    3.2 Content Creators: Career Pathways and Real-World Connection
    Content Creators: Career Pathways and Real-World Connection Do you have any artistic abilities? Do you like to create original content? The second domain we will look at that helps to support the Players in the esports world is the Content Creators. Careers in esports-related fields for Content Creators include graphic and digital artwork within game design companies and freelance work as cosplay and makeup artists. They help develop media content as journalists and live/social media content as shoutcasters and streamers, reporting on esports teams and events. They also find lucrative careers in website design and development. The Content Creators domain has five career focuses - Software Developers, Shoutcasters, Streamers, Journalists, and Fandom Art & Media. Let’s take a moment to look at each of these careers! Software Developers Software Developers design computer applications or programs. What do they do? Analyze users’ needs and then design and develop software to meet those needs Recommend software upgrades for customers’ existing programs and systems Design each piece of an application or system and plan how the pieces will work together Create a variety of models and diagrams showing programmers the software code needed for an application Ensure that a program continues to function normally through software maintenance and testing Document every aspect of an application or system as a reference for future maintenance and upgrades What skills do they need? Analytical Skills: They must evaluate users’ needs and design software to function correctly and meet those needs. Communication Skills: They must be able to give clear instructions and explain problems that arise to other team members involved in development. They must also be able to explain to non-technical users, such as customers, how the software worlds and answer any questions that arise. Creativity Skills: They must be innovative in designing, identifying problems, and improving the computer software. Detail-Oriented Skills: They often need to concentrate on many parts of an application or system simultaneously and must pay attention to detail when looking for potential areas of user error. Interpersonal Skills: They must work well with others who contribute to designing, programming, and testing successful software. Problem-Solving Skills: They must be able to solve problems that arise throughout the design process. Technological Skills: They must understand how various technologies work and be able to learn and troubleshoot both hardware and software issues. Shoutcasters Shoutcasters provide commentary and host events. What do they do? Present information to be broadcasted online or at venues Interview guests at events Research topics for comment and discussion during events Read prepared scripts Provide commentary for the audience during events Select program content Introduce upcoming acts and guide the audience through the entertainment Make promotional appearances at public or private events What skills do they need? Computer Skills: They should be comfortable using editing software and other broadcast-related devices. Interpersonal Skills: They interview guests, answer calls on the air, and may interact with listeners on social media. Persistence Skills: They must realize that entry into this occupation is very competitive and may need to audition many times for an opportunity. They must be willing to work for small events to gain experience. Research Skills: They must research essential topics of the day to be knowledgeable enough to comment on them during their events. Speaking Skills: They must have a pleasant and well-controlled voice, good timing, and excellent pronunciation. Writing Skills: They need strong writing skills because they usually write their material. Streamers Streamers broadcast themselves online through a live stream or prerecorded video. What do they do? Broadcast activities to a live audience as a form of entertainment to a specific audience Demonstrate skill in the activity they are engaging in Provide entertainment and communication channels to and from the audience What skills do they need? Critical Thinking Skills: They must find solutions to problems, whether in the game, for the productivity of the business, or work-life balance. Creativity Skills: They must come up with new and innovative ideas. Collaboration Skills: They work with others as a content creation team, taking down the enemy players with teammates or working with other streamers to host significant events. Communication Skills: They must be able to communicate in a practical, respectful, and entertaining way to their target audiences, as well as to any other members of their content creation team. Informational-Literacy Skills: They need to know when they are getting the most views, what people like, and when to produce what kinds of content by understanding facts, figures, statistics, and data. Technological Skills: They must understand the platform and software they are streaming on to use the available tools most. Journalists Journalists keep the public updated about current events and important information. What do they do? Research topics that an editor or news director has assigned to them Develop relationships with experts and contacts who provide tips and leads on stories or articles Interview people who have information, analysis, or opinions about a story or article Analyze and interpret information to increase audience understanding of the news Write stories or articles for newspapers, magazines, or websites and create scripts to be read on television or radio Review stories or articles for accuracy, style, and grammar Update stories or articles as new information becomes available Investigate new story or article ideas and pitch ideas to editors What skills do they need? Communication Skills: They must convey information with solid writing skills. Interpersonal Skills: They must be able to build relationships, develop contacts, and conduct interviews. They also need to work well with their colleagues. Persistence Skills: They must be determined when pursuing stories or articles. Investigating topics and gathering facts may be difficult, mainly when those involved refuse to be interviewed or to provide comments. Stamina Skills: They often work in a fast-paced and exhausting environment. They must be able to adapt to the irregular hours of work. Technological Skills: They should be able to use editing equipment and other broadcast-related devices. They should also be able to use multimedia and coding software to publish stories on websites and mobile devices. Fandom Art & Media Fandom Art & Media uses various materials and techniques to create art for sale and exhibition. What do they do? Use techniques such as knitting, weaving, glassblowing, painting, drawing, and sculpting Develop creative ideas or new methods for making art Create sketches, templates, or models to guide their work Select which materials to use based on color, texture, strength, and other criteria. Shape, join, or cut materials for a final product Use visual techniques, such as composition, color, space, and perspective to produce desired artistic effects Develop portfolios highlighting their artistic styles and abilities to show to gallery owners and others interested in their work Display their work at auctions, craft fairs, galleries, museums, and online marketplaces Complete grant proposals and applications to obtain financial support for projects What skills do they need? Artistic Ability Skills: They create artwork and other objects that are visually appealing or thought-provoking. This endeavor requires significant skill and attention to detail in one or more art forms. Business Skills: They must promote themselves and their art to build a reputation to sell their art. They often study the market for their crafts or artwork to increase their understanding of what prospective customers might want. They also may sell their work on the internet, so developing an online presence is often an essential part of their art sales. Creativity Skills: They must have active imaginations to develop new and original ideas for their work. Customer-Service Skills: They must be good at dealing with customers and prospective buyers. Dexterity Skills: They must be good at manipulating tools and materials to create their art. Interpersonal Skills: They should be comfortable interacting with people, including customers, gallery owners, and the public. Apply What You've Learned There were many skills mentioned that these careers needed. In the activity below, you will see definitions for some of the skills that were mentioned in the five careers of the Content Creators domain. Drag and drop each tile to its appropriate definition. Can you identify all five? Lesson Review To support the Players in the esports world, the Content Creators have five careers: Software Developers Shoutcasters Streamers Journalists Fandom Art & Media Four of these careers have interpersonal skills listed as needed to perform the job. Please take a moment to think about all the skills used in creating video games, from the beginning stages to when the public gains access to them! Next, we will look at the different sections of video game advertisements. Click here to view the next lesson: 3.3-Content Creators: Parts of Print Advertisements. Images: "Producer producing a production" by Obi - @pixel6propix under Unsplash License "Coding" by Christopher Gower under Unsplash License "A sounds engineer works on a song using one of the few Slate Raven 23 Production Units in the United States" by Obi - @pixel6propix under Unsplash License Image by Stem List under Unsplash License Image by christopher lemercier under Unsplash License Image by Joe007 under Pixabay License "A Man Doing a Podcast" by Emmanuel Jason Eliphalet under Pexels License "Black Flat Screen Computer Monitor on White Wooden Desk" by Roberto Nickon under Pexels License Image by Stem List under Unsplash License Image by Unknown under CC0 1.0, via PxHere "Man Holding Black Dslr Camera" by Mustafa Husnii under Pexels License "radio milenium microphones" by patriciojorge70 under CC0 1.0, via PxHere "Four Person in Naruto Costume" by Donald Tong under Pexels License "Mosaic Alien on Wall" by Francesco Ungaro under Pexels License "Focus Photo of Super Mario, Luigi, and Yoshi Figurines" by Pixabay under CC0 1.0, via Pexels "An Animal Head X-ray Image on the Computer Monitor" by Tima Miroshnichenko under Pexels License Adapted content: "Occupational Outlook Handbook: Software Developers, Quality Assurance Analysts, and Testers" by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics under Bureau of Labor Statistics Public Domain "Occupational Outlook Handbook: Announcers and DJs" by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics under Bureau of Labor Statistics Public Domain "Occupational Outlook Handbook: News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists" by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics under Bureau of Labor Statistics Public Domain "Occupational Outlook Handbook: Craft and Fine Artists" by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics under Bureau of Labor Statistics Public Domain Images, adapted content, and course structure: "Middle School Curriculum Esports Elective" by NASEF under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, via NASEF Original content by Michigan Virtual, unless otherwise noted. 2022. CC BY-NC-SA 4.0  
    By: Michigan Virtual
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